Sponsor Deadline
Posted: 7/17/2023

Career Awards at the Scientific Interface

Recognizing the vital role cross-trained scientists will play in furthering biomedical science, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund developed the Career Awards at the Scientific Interface. These grants are intended to foster the early career development of researchers who are dedicated to pursuing a career in academic research. The specific target group are researchers who have transitioned from graduate work in the physical/mathematical/computational sciences or engineering into postdoctoral work in the biological sciences.

BWF’s Career Awards at the Scientific Interface (CASI) provide $500,000 over five years to bridge advanced postdoctoral training and the first three years of faculty service. These awards are open to U.S. and Canadian citizens, permanent residents, or temporary residents.

Scientific advances such as genomics, quantitative structural biology, imaging techniques, and modeling of complex systems have created opportunities for exciting research careers at the interface between the physical/ computational sciences and the biological sciences. Tackling key problems in biology will require scientists trained in areas such as chemistry, physics, applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering..

Deadlines: 

  • Required Letter of Intent Deadline: September 1, 2023
  • Invited Full Proposal Deadline: January 8, 2024
Eligibility Requirements
Candidates are expected to draw from their training in a scientific field other than biology to propose innovative approaches to answer important questions in the biological sciences. Examples of approaches include, but are not limited to: physical measurement of biological phenomena, computer simulation of complex processes in physiological systems, mathematical modeling of self-organizing behavior, building probabilistic tools for medical diagnosis, developing novel imaging tools or biosensors, developing or applying nanotechnology to manipulate cellular systems, predicting cellular responses to topological clues and mechanical forces, and developing a new conceptual understanding of the complexity of living organisms.    Candidates must hold a PhD degree in one of the fields of mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science, statistics, or engineering. This includes  related areas of physical, mathematical, computational, theoretical, and engineering science. Exceptions will be made only if the applicant can demonstrate significant expertise in one of these areas, evidenced by publications, undergraduate major, or master’s degree.   Candidates whose PhD is in biochemistry/biophysics/ biology/cell biology/etc. may be eligible if significant accomplishment or competence in one of the areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science, statistics, or engineering can be shown (i.e., papers published, advanced coursework, or undergraduate major), and if the proposal draws on that background. Work must be interdisciplinary and make use of nonbiological approaches.   Candidates who hold an MD are eligible to apply if they hold both an MD and a PhD, and the PhD is in one of the fields of mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science, statistics, or engineering. This includes related areas of physical and computational science. Exceptions will be made only if the applicant can demonstrate significant expertise in one these areas, evidenced by publications, undergraduate major, or master’s degree. In addition, the applicant cannot have spent more than 60 months in postdoctoral research since receipt of terminal degree. If the candidate holds an MD without also holding a PhD, the candidate is not eligible to apply to this program.   Candidates must have completed at least 12 months but not more than 60 months of postdoctoral research by the date of the full invited application deadline. Post Ph.D work experience in any scientific research field (including outside academia) cannot exceed 60 months. However, if a portion of the post PhD work timeline was not in a science research field, and the total scientific work experience does not exceed 60 months, the candidate may be eligible but must gain prior approval from the BWF program officer.  No exceptions to this requirement will be made.   Candidates cannot hold nor have accepted, either in writing or verbally, a faculty appointment as a tenure-track assistant professor at the time of application –both LOI and full application. This award cannot be made to a tenure-track faculty member because it is a transition award. If a faculty position is accepted after the full application deadline, the candidate may not start the new position until after the start date of the award.
Duke Awardees

2003: Lindsay G. Cowell, Ph.D.
A novel statistical approach to deducing the function of regulatory DNA: examples from analyses of recombination signal sequences

2011: Nicolas E. Buchler, Ph.D.
Gene duplication and the evolution of function in regulatory networks

2015: Francisco Eduardo Robles, Ph.D.
Molecular imaging based on the linear and nonlinear refractive index for biomedical applications

2016: David M. Schneider, Ph.D.
Neural circuits for making predictions and learning from mistakes

 

Amount
$500,000
Funding Type
Eligibility
Posted
7/17/2023
Deadline
Sponsor: