NINDS Faculty Development Award to Promote Diversity in Neuroscience Research (K01 Clinical Trial Required)

Funding Agency:
National Institutes of Health

The purpose of the NINDS Faculty Development Award to Promote Diversity in Neuroscience Research (K01) is to diversify the pool of independent neuroscience research investigators by providing junior faculty with research cost support, protected research time and career stage appropriate professional development mentorship in neuroscience research. Individuals from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical research are eligible for support under this award if they have doctoral research degrees (Ph.D. or equivalent) and are in the first 3 years of a faculty tenure track or equivalent position at the time of application.

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is designed specifically for applicants proposing to serve as the lead investigator of an independent clinical trial, a clinical trial feasibility study, or a separate ancillary study to an existing trial, as part of their research and career development. NINDS will only accept applications to this FOA that propose human mechanistic trials/studies that meet NIH's definition of a clinical trial and that fall within the NINDS research priorities. Applicants are strongly advised to consult with NINDS program staff prior to submitting an application with human subjects to determine the appropriate funding opportunity.

This FOA supports hypothesis-driven mechanistic clinical trial studies in basic and/or translational discovery research in healthy human subjects and in the pathobiology, pathophysiology, and neuropathology of neurological disorders. The goal is to address basic questions and to interrogate concepts in biology, behavior, and pathophysiology that will provide insight into understanding neurological disorders.  Such studies may seek to understand a biological or behavioral process, or the mechanism of action of an intervention. NINDS supports biomarker studies that may provide information about physiological function, target engagement of novel therapeutics, and/or mechanisms of therapeutic responses. The submitted studies are defined as clinical trials (NOT-OD-15-015) but do not seek to answer specific questions about safety, tolerability, clinical efficacy, effectiveness, clinical management, and/or implementation of pharmacologic, behavioral, biologic, surgical, or device (invasive or non-invasive) interventions. preventive, therapeutic, and services interventions. Such designs should be submitted to an NINDS clinical trial-specific funding announcement (listed on the NINDS website at https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Current-Research/Research-Funded-NINDS/Clinical-Research).

Applicants not planning an independent clinical trial, or proposing to gain research experience in a clinical trial led by another investigator, must apply to companion FOA (FOA PAR-18-490).

Deadlines:

  • K Series Deadlines: Feb. 12, Jun. 12, Oct. 12.
  • AIDS Deadlines: Jan. 7, May 7, Sep. 7.

PAR-18-486 Expiration Date: New Date January 8, 2021

Agency Website

Eligibility Requirements

The overarching goal of this FOA is to enhance the pool of independent neuroscience research investigators from diverse backgrounds.

Candidates (as defined in eligiblity category A and/or B below) with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research as the Program Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI) are invited to work with his/her mentor(s) and organization to develop an application for support. For the purposes of this FOA individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups as well as individuals with disabilities are the only eligible individuals for this award. Multiple PDs/PIs are not allowed.

Fostering diversity in the scientific research workforce is a key component of the NIH strategy to identify, develop, support and maintain the quality of our scientific human capital (NOT-OD-15-053).

Every facet of the United States scientific research enterprise—from basic laboratory research to clinical and translational research to policy formation–requires superior intellect, creativity and a wide range of skill sets and viewpoints. NIH’s ability to help ensure that the nation remains a global leader in scientific discovery and innovation is dependent upon a pool of highly talented scientists from diverse backgrounds who will help to further NIH's mission.

Research shows that diverse teams working together and capitalizing on innovative ideas and distinct perspectives outperform homogenous teams. Scientists and trainees from diverse backgrounds and life experiences bring different perspectives, creativity, and individual enterprise to address complex scientific problems. There are many benefits that flow from a diverse NIH-supported scientific workforce, including: fostering scientific innovation, enhancing global competitiveness, contributing to robust learning environments, improving the quality of the researchers, advancing the likelihood that underserved or health disparity populations participate in, and benefit from health research, and enhancing public trust.

In spite of tremendous advancements in scientific research, information, educational and research opportunities are not equally available to all. NIH encourages institutions to diversify their student and faculty populations to enhance the participation of individuals from groups identified as underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral and social sciences, such as:

A. Individuals from racial and ethnic groups that have been shown by the National Science Foundation to be underrepresented in health-related sciences on a national basis (see data at http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/showpub.cfm?TopID=2&SubID=27) and the report Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering). The following racial and ethnic groups have been shown to be underrepresented in biomedical research: Blacks or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, American Indians or Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders.

B. Individuals with disabilities, who are defined as those with a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, as described in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended.  See NSF data at, http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/2013/pdf/tab7-5_updated_2014_10.pdf . 

Current and former PDs/PIs on NIH research project (R01), program project (P01), center grants (P50), sub-projects of program project (P01), sub-projects of center grants (P50), other career development awards (K–awards), or the equivalent are not eligible. Current and former PDs/PIs of an NIH Small Grant (R03), Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21), Dissertation Award (R36), or SBIR/STTR (R41, R42, R43, R44) remain eligible.

Career Stage: Candidates for this award must have earned a terminal research doctoral degree or a combined clinical and research doctoral degree. Junior faculty who are in the first 3 years of a faculty tenure track or equivalent position at the time of award are eligible and will have completed their research training. At the time of award, the institution must demonstrate that the applicant will have the academic title, space and other resources necessary to apply for research project grant (e.g., R01) level funding.

The candidates must have research experience (length of time may vary) and be committed to developing into independent biomedical investigators in research areas relevant to the mission of the NINDS.  The program is not intended to support additional graduate training and is not intended to support career changes from non-research to research careers for individuals without prior research training.

Funding Type

Grant

Eligibility

African American
Hispanic
Junior Faculty
Minorities encouraged
Native American
Post Doctoral Fellows
Women of Color

Category

Medical
Medical - Basic Science
Medical - Clinical Science
Medical - Translational

External Deadline

June 12, 2019